Category Archives: Consentua

How do I manage consent? Consentua of Course!

For most organisations, consent is probably the most used condition for the process of personal data. Many organisations recognise that they have to improve how they manage consent. Making the request clear and easy to understand, for example.Consentua logo and ticked checkboxes for to manage consent

Consentua provides Choice and Control over personal data.

Many people see the incoming General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) as an opportunity to better understand the customer. What better way of improving your brand’s trust than via a clear and transparent explanation as to what personal data is processed and why this benefits the end user?

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VivaTech Paris – Consentua on tour

 

VivaTech Paris

VivaTech Paris Entrance at Parc D’Expositions.

VivaTech Paris 2017

The KnowNow team were at VivaTech in Paris recently.  We were there to man a stand and pitch to a panel.  Tom & I had been invited by Air France to participate as they wanted to know more about Consentua. Our new personal data consent management service.

This was the first time we had taken Consentua to a trade show.  We had a great time and had some fanatics interest in our new service.

To read how we got on check out the blog I wrote here

Review of KnowNows Rollercoaster 2016

What a Year! What a Ride!

2016 was a very interesting year from KnowNow’s perspective.   We made a decision to pivot, we won some battles, lost some skirmishes and we have made some customers very happy.     We also had to say goodbye to some old friends too.  As Dave & I both said to each other at our end of year review  “it has been a rollercoaster of a year!”.

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Night photo of Kuala Lumpur's famous Petronas Twin Towers - a must visit for the Malaysia Trade Mission!

KnowNow represented at UK Government Malaysia Trade Mission

David is delighted to be travelling to Kuala Lumpur to represent KnowNow at the UK Government’s Malaysia trade mission next week. He will join a group representing high growth UK companies at the technology mission organised by the Department for International Trade (DIT).

Night photo of Kuala Lumpur's famous Petronas Twin Towers - a must visit for the Malaysia Trade Mission!

Kuala Lumpur’s famous Petronas Twin Towers – a must visit for the Malaysia Trade Mission!

New DIT Support Programme

KnowNow Information was selected earlier this year to be an inaugural member of the DIT’s Company Sub-Sector Support Programme (CSSP). This initiative is designed to help high growth UK businesses expand into targeted export markets. The aim is to deliver £350m of new export revenue for UK companies through collaboration with Malaysian organisations in the chosen priority sub-sectors. Continue reading

How to implement consent for your council under GDPR

A new service from KnowNow Information, Consentua, helps organisations build citizen trust as required under General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR). It provides data processing transparency and gives citizens the choice and control needed to share data safely and comfortably.

Consentua logo

Consentua – privacy and consent service

Consentua captures users’ consent to the use of their personal data. It provides GDPR compliance to organisations that process data. It also allows individuals to control how their personal data is being used.

You can now sign up to Consentua via CC2i, the collaborative government services co-funding platform at

http://cc2i.org.uk/co-fund/current-pitches/consentua-gdpr-compliance-service-and-cookbook/

What is Consentua?

Consentua is a consent management system from KnowNow Information that helps organisations to achieve GDPR’s data protection compliance. It also gives individuals choice and control over how their personal data is used.

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Future Watch Part 3 logo

Future Watch: Privacy and Social Media

Future Watch 3 – Privacy and Social Media

Tech legend and one-half of Know Now, Chris Cooper concludes the discussion with Gemma Christie on data security and privacy. They talk openly about how Facebook and Google use your data, along with a great sandwich story. We also take a look at what the future holds for having more control over your own personal digital footprint.

 

G: You wrote your article ‘5 rules of thumb and security of YOUR data’ in 2015 so it’s about a year old now. Do you think there have been any substantial improvements within the last year?

C: No. I think it’s got worse, to tell the truth.

 

G: In what way?

C: We’re seeing more and more stuff being connected without any good agreement on what constitutes good security design. There are a number of standards that are out there, but there isn’t an agreement on the handshake and the trusted exchange of information between devices. There isn’t a mechanism for what I call the ‘lizard principle’ or the ‘lizard tail principle’ for where you could shut something down and confine it and contain where you have maybe a risk or an exposure, and you can sacrifice that particular component.

I think where so many of the solutions that we see coming through are what I call ‘single-threaded decision makers’, so you have one sensor or one trigger that leads to one action, and all it takes is for that one thing to be compromised, and it just sets in chain a whole run of events.

A good holistic design has multiple decision-making points reinforcing a trend. If you’re responding to that trend proactively, it will achieve some type of difference. Where we seem to be, is on things that are going, right, I want to know something about the state of this area, and then once it reaches a certain point then I’m going to go do something else.

An example of this could be: river flow is going up, let’s open up a sluice gate. A sluice gate only has one centre and if that centre is compromised, the sluice gate doesn’t open. People get flooded. That just seems really poor design, a lack of thought on how you make stuff happen and a lack of desire, in my opinion, to invest appropriately in a fit-for-purpose solution that would stand the test of time. We tend to be buying on price for the short term and not investing in a project for the medium to long term.

So no, I don’t think how our ethos and how we approach projects, how we are trying to deliver stuff and connect stuff up, is following good systems practice. We’re still seeing a number of poorly-designed, poorly-implemented solutions, especially in the internet space.

The 5 reasons to worry about security

G: In the article that was written last year, you said there are five good reasons we need to worry about security?

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Citizens Now Have Consent Part 2

Part 2 – What is happening now…

The Business Case is warming up

Cognicity

Cognicity – the business accelerator KnowNow participated in 2015.

When it came to KnowNow’s innovative new consent tool what we needed was a view of the market.   We needed to move from a hunch to a viable innovation backed up with evidence.

A consequence of being on a business accelerator is that you take a more methodical based approach to your innovation validation.   This means fail fast and do the bare minimum and push only what has a positive response. Do more of that and less of the things that are not so positive. This is an iterative experience.

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Citizens Now Have Consent – Part 1

Part 1: The Story So Far

For smart cities to be considered a success they will have many different types of services e.g. for health, mobility, energy and crime. How services are delivered, measured and valued will be transformed and citizens will now consume experiences and share most things that were previously owned. It will just make sense that way. However, there is a big assumption in this futuristic view.  Consent.

What’s the big assumption?

That citizens will have allowed some quite personal information to be consumed, shared and distributed. Yet, this laissez faire view does not necessarily work for all. In particular when it comes to the European countries with the new GDPR, a growing number of citizens are hesitant about sharing their data freely, according to the latest MEF report some 41% of citizens have this concern. Yet a total clamp down on personal information use is not appropriate either, because no personal information share means no experiences and no transformed services.

So what is to be done?

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